Monday , January 22 2018
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I Want to See More Autism Awareness in Schools to Help Put an End to Bullying

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One of the quotes I often see out there in the autism community is:

“I don’t think the worst thing that could happen to me is raising a child with autism. I think the worst thing is to raise a child who is cruel to those with autism.”

One of my earliest memories of cruelty to another child was by a bully. My peer had a last name that sounded similar to an insect, and one day a bully who saw a bug on the ground at school stepped on it and told my peer, “Looks like I just stepped on your cousin.” 

Words aren’t harmless. They can hurt our loved ones. It made me sick to see something like that. While my peer, distraught and close to tears, tried to compose himself, I wanted to say something to the bully but just didn’t know how. All I could think about was the ignorance I saw.

When I think of the quote above, I often think about the ignorance that is still out there today. When I speak in schools about bullying prevention and autism awareness, so many children still don’t know what autism islet alone that Autism Awareness Month is in April and World Autism Awareness Day takes place on April 2.

Other times, I asked them what attention deficit hyperactivity disorder/attention deficit disorder (ADHD/ADD)dyslexiacerebral palsy or Down syndrome is, and they didn’t have a clue about those either.

It makes me often think about the future for our community. One of the biggest changes I observed when I moved from public school to a private school forstudents with disabilities in fifth grade was a significant increase in disability awareness. Not only would the school share facts about most disabilities, they would also share stories about inspiring celebrities who have disabilities to try and inspire us.

That type of awareness is something I wish more people would advocate for. It’s been shown that if you educate a child early on, much like giving a child with autism early intervention, you can give them a great opportunity to progress as they get older.

One of the quotes I often see out there in the autism community is:

“I don’t think the worst thing that could happen to me is raising a child with autism. I think the worst thing is to raise a child who is cruel to those with autism.”

One of my earliest memories of cruelty to another child was by a bully. My peer had a last name that sounded similar to an insect, and one day a bully who saw a bug on the ground at school stepped on it and told my peer, “Looks like I just stepped on your cousin.” 

Words aren’t harmless. They can hurt our loved ones. It made me sick to see something like that. While my peer, distraught and close to tears, tried to compose himself, I wanted to say something to the bully but just didn’t know how. All I could think about was the ignorance I saw.

When I think of the quote above, I often think about the ignorance that is still out there today. When I speak in schools about bullying prevention and autism awareness, so many children still don’t know what autism islet alone that Autism Awareness Month is in April and World Autism Awareness Day takes place on April 2.

Other times, I asked them what attention deficit hyperactivity disorder/attention deficit disorder (ADHD/ADD)dyslexiacerebral palsy or Down syndrome is, and they didn’t have a clue about those either.

It makes me often think about the future for our community. One of the biggest changes I observed when I moved from public school to a private school forstudents with disabilities in fifth grade was a significant increase in disability awareness. Not only would the school share facts about most disabilities, they would also share stories about inspiring celebrities who have disabilities to try and inspire us.

That type of awareness is something I wish more people would advocate for. It’s been shown that if you educate a child early on, much like giving a child with autism early intervention, you can give them a great opportunity to progress as they get older.

We need to teach our kids that autism is not a tragedy. Ignorance is the tragedy. Then hopefully these kids can focus more on making friends, getting the supports they need and living a life where cruelty among bullies is a thing of the past.

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One comment

  1. I had enjoyable state nursery and infants school experiences, as I was locked in a storeroom day in day out where I could have my meltdowns into near death coma without disrupting the curriculum of everyone else. I could already read and write to university external exam standard a year before Nursery, and supervised my own education and was therefore happy as a house without a roof, whatever that means. But I did not enjoy my time in state junior school, because, my reputation went before me, and in morning assembly on my first day there, the head teacher gave me the nickname, Witchcraft, and reminded the rest of the school that the Bible says, Thou Shalt Not Suffer A Witch To Live, so they tried to kill me by each kicking me in the head as I sat on the floor, or on the playground, four times every day for a week. But I kept coming back to life, which reinforced the head teachers point, in a sense, so, on the Friday, after school, as my parents did nothing to stop this happening, I ran away from home, and killed myself stone cold, autopsy ready, clinically dead, four times, and the last time lasted 48 hours, so search parties went out looking for me. When one of them found me, rigor had set in and my nails had shrivelled up and dropped off. I was ordered for autopsy and sat up when being stripped and washed down, by my mother, for an undertaker to convey me by coffin to the local morgue. It was a good thing I came back to life when I did, as I could have suffocated in the coffin, or had my brain removed and popped in a jar of formaldehyde in a fridge in the morgue. The truth would have been suppressed. But, as it was my mother stripping and washing me when I came back to life, she knew the truth and I never attended state schools again, except as an articled pupil, so the teachers had to protect me under contracts to my parents who nominally paid the fees. The head teacher had another pop at me on the day I qualified to go work abroad to escape the prejudice. He cracked my head open and sliced up my brain, so even if I came back to life, I’d be a cabbage. But Life, Death, Nature, Fate, Fortune, God, the Universe. and All That, had other ideas. I’ve written all about it in, Dafydd Bach: Death of Innocence: The Beginning, which went viral and held the #1 slot on Amazon Co Uk and Amazon Com, in my genre and niche for quite a long time in 2014, as I recall.

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